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About Shaheed Abdol

About Shaheed Abdol

Well, there isn't much left to say about him ... Shaheed is a computer programmer, born and raised in Cape Town, 27 years old as of the writing of this page, and enjoys trying to swim, biking and having fun with his guitar...

Shaheed grew up in Silvertown, in the Athlone area, and has worked in different industries in the programming world, first as a freelance PHP programmer for a huge, worldwide company ... then as a C++ and SQL developer for a systems integration firm. Shaheed has recently moved into the digital publishing industry and currently works as an eBook setter with Trace Digital Services.

He spends his days with is lovely wife, Fatima and their son Junaid.

If you want to know more about Shaheed, you can head on over to his website and learn about the different aspects of his life, and how it all shaped him into the person he is today.

You can find his website at ShaheedAbdol.co.za.


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