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Self-Motivation is hard!

Ok, so it's been a while since my last update. I've been grinding away at this game so hard, and made very little progress as you can see here. 

I've been grinding away at this game for a while now and I've learned a lot.

The number one thing I've learned so far is that I should have spent a few weeks learning a really good game engine and then just used that. 

I've spent so much time just writing boilerplate and infrastructure, that I've yet to build a decent game. 

I remember complaining so much about the lack of game engine choices and how hard they are to learn - but, it's even harder writing everything from scratch. And when I say "everything", I mean EVERYTHING! 

I've created resource loading classes, scene management, view trees, sound management, audio queues, playlists, rendering pipelines, camera classes, starfields, parallax scrolling, state management. 

Everything, painstakingly written from scratch. 

For one redeeming moment I can at least say that I've learned an incredible amount of things - how to do things, as well as how not to do things. 

But if I may pass on some knowledge to you, it will definitely be this: If your goals to learn, then do what I did, learn and create from scratch. 

Just don't expect to write a complete game this way. 

If your goal is simply to create a good game, then use a decent engine, somethig that has most of what you need. 

You'll get most of the way to your vision without the infrastructure getting in the way. 

Iff you have lots of time and you're a masochist, then join me, I'm in room 11 tearing my hair out.

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